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 Dis-used railway

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Sparkeswood



Location : Kent,England

PostSubject: Dis-used railway   Sat Oct 08, 2011 3:26 pm

Maybe I could do this with my line Laughing I have enough overgrown bits.....


BBC LINK
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Paulus



Location : The Netherlands

PostSubject: Re: Dis-used railway   Sat Oct 08, 2011 3:39 pm

Clever solution. Although I prefer trains on them I think New-Yorkers are more happy with these 'parks in the skies'.
In The Netherlands we have many long distance and scenic cycling roads on old railroad and tramway routes.

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Carl Hibbs
Admin


Location : Haute Normandie - visitors welcome

PostSubject: Re: Dis-used railway   Sat Oct 08, 2011 8:01 pm

I visited this 'line' in February this year and had mixed feelings about it.
Great that they didn't completely remove it but sad that they didn't keep some sort of working railway in part or a museum.
What is intriguing is what looks like dual gauge, standard and 3 feet. Does anyone know the railway history of this?

Here are my pics of it:


















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Paul Stanton



Location : Chesterfield, New Jersey, USA

PostSubject: Re: Dis-used railway   Sun Oct 09, 2011 11:57 am

It is what remains of the elevated portion of the New York Central's West Side Line.
From what I have read, electric frieght motors utilized (inside?) third rail electrification.
Some of the third rail rail was removed when RS-3's started switching the line.

Very interesting, I will have to visit someday.

Paul
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Paulus



Location : The Netherlands

PostSubject: Re: Dis-used railway   Sun Oct 09, 2011 1:14 pm

Quote :
Does anyone know the railway history of this?

Found this on Wikipedia - The High Line:

In 1847, the City of New York authorized street-level railroad tracks down Manhattan’s West Side. For safety, the railroads hired men – the "West Side Cowboys" – to ride horses and wave flags in front of the trains.[4] Yet so many accidents occurred between freight trains and other traffic that 10th Avenue became known as "Death Avenue".

After years of public debate about the hazard, in 1929 the city and the state of New York and the New York Central Railroad agreed on the West Side Improvement Project, which included the High Line. The 13-mile (21 km) project eliminated 105 street-level railroad crossings and added 32 acres (130,000 m2) to Riverside Park. It cost over $150 million, about $2 billion in 2009 dollars.[4]
The High Line opened to trains in 1934. It originally ran from 34th Street to St. John's Park Terminal, at Spring Street. It was designed to go through the center of blocks, rather than over the avenue, to avoid the drawbacks of elevated subways. It connected directly to factories and warehouses, allowing trains to roll right inside buildings. Milk, meat, produce, and raw and manufactured goods could be transported and unloaded without disturbing traffic on the streets.[4] This also reduced pilferage for the Bell Laboratories Building, now the Westbeth Artists Community, and the Nabisco plant, now Chelsea Market, which were served from protected sidings within the structures.[5]
The train also passed underneath the Western Electric complex at Washington Street. This section has survived until today and is not connected with the rest of the developed park.[6]
The growth of interstate trucking in the 1950s led to a drop in rail traffic throughout the nation. In the 1960s, the southernmost section of the line was demolished. This section started at Gansevoort Street and ran down Washington Street as far as Clarkson Street, representing almost half of the line. The last train ran in 1980 with three carloads of frozen turkeys.[4]
In the mid-1980s, a group of property owners with land under the line lobbied for the demolition of the entire structure. Peter Obletz, a Chelsea resident, activist, and railroad enthusiast, challenged the demolition efforts in court and tried to re-establish rail service on the Line.[4] In the 1990s, as the line lay unused, it became known to a few urban explorers and local residents for the tough, drought-tolerant wild grasses, shrubs, and trees that had sprung up in the gravel along the abandoned railway.
In 1999, the non-profit Friends of the High Line[4] was formed by Joshua David and Robert Hammond, residents of the neighborhood the High Line ran through. They advocated for the Line's preservation and reuse as public open space. Broadened community support of public redevelopment for the High Line for pedestrian use grew, and city funding was allocated in 2004. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and City Council Speakers Gifford Miller and Christine C. Quinn were important supporters. The southernmost section, from Gansevoort Street to 20th Street, opened as a city park on June 8, 2009.[7] The middle section opened in June 2011, while the northernmost section's future remains uncertain, depending on a development project currently underway at the Hudson Yards.

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Paul pirat
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Carl Hibbs
Admin


Location : Haute Normandie - visitors welcome

PostSubject: Re: Dis-used railway   Sun Oct 09, 2011 6:13 pm

I found this interesting article:

West Side improvement

Looking at some of the b & w pics the extra rails were neither a different gauge nor electric but just some sort of check rail.
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KleineDicke



Location : Deep in the Heart of Texas (Houston)

PostSubject: Re: Dis-used railway   Sun Oct 09, 2011 6:55 pm

NY Central ran tri-power (Diesel/Electric/Battery) locos on this line. The electrics used third rail pickup. These units were also used on the predecessor ground level lines as were steam (normal and tram style) before the state of NY outlawed steam in New York City in 1923 (the Kaufman Act). The tri-power was necessary because the sidings were not electrified.

There's a good collection of period photos (including the Cowboys!) of the West Side Line here.

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Bill Wray

"It is one of the happiest characteristics
of this glorious country that official utterances are invariably
regarded as unanswerable."
-Sir Joseph Porter, First Lord of the Admiralty (HMS Pinafore)
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